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Oakley Glasses: Intel’s Radar Pace Empowered Athletic Smart Glasses

Jan 06, 2016 07:52 AM EST

Intel has showed off a wearable tech, addressed as Radar Pace on stage at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on Tuesday night. The demonstrated special smart glasses, designed for the athletes, are scheduled to get released later this year.

The wearable tech will apparently be available in sunglasses made by the Luxottica-owned Oakley brand. The interactive sunglasses, capable of coaching with voice, have been jointly ventured by Intel and Luxottica.

Equipped with special earpieces on either side, Intel CEO Brian Kraznich has demoed operation of the Oakley glasses through video as well as live presentation. The glasses allow athletes to get informed about the speed and distance travelled while running. Unlike Google Glass, the Radar Pace technology instructs the wearer doing everything just by talking, reports Business Insider.

At last year's CES, Intel has announced a tie-up with Oakley to develop smart eyewear and on Tuesday, shown the fruits of that labor. On that very day, Intel has also unveiled a new collaboration with New Balance that will help connect athletes with technology, reports Tech Times.

New Balance itself has created a new division called Digital Sport, which is aimed at helping athletes improve their workouts, and so on, through technology. Of course, these technologies will be powered by Intel from now on. Furthermore, New Balance is developing a smartwatch in collaboration with Intel, which will launch in the holiday season of this year.

The glasses obviously have earplugs and a microphone and a tiny computer on one of the arms. A bit alike Google Glass in that sense, Radar Pace looks more like a normal pair of sunglasses and a lot less dorky.

The glasses are suitable for runners and cyclists, reports PCWorld quoting Intel CEO. But he neither has hinted about cost nor explained the technology functions behind the operations.

The Oakley Glasses probably use Intel's Curie chip, which has an on-board processor, accelerometer and Bluetooth radio. Since GPS uses a lot of battery power, so it may be presumed that the coaching glasses are required to function through a smartphone for analyzing positions.

The glasses have been reported to be part of a keynote speech that focused heavily on sports and fitness. Since Intel tries to get more of its chips into wearable devices, so analysts assumes of hearing more about pricing closer to their release.

Intel has premiered a wearable tech; Oakley branded smart glasses in the Tuesday's Consumer Electronics Show, 2016. The intelligent glasses, capable of coaching the athletes through vocal guidance, have been ventured by Intel in collaboration with Oakley owning Luxottica. Radar Pace, technology involved in the smart glasses, instructs the wearer doing everything just by talking while analyzing through GPS.

 
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